Orthodox Confessional Theology

email: Rev. Dale A. Dumperth | Church Secretary | Web Administrator
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Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Divine Service 10:30 a.m.
Adult Catechesis, Mon. 7:00 p.m.
Youth Catechesis, Wed. 6:00 p.m.


When the LCMS came into existence, it brought together a remarkable assortment of people from a variety of backgrounds and commitments: F.C.D. Wyneken in Ft. Wayne, Indiana; August Cramer in Frankenmuth, Michigan; Wilhelm Sihler and his colleagues in Ohio; and the Saxons in St. Louis and Perry Count, Missouri, led ultimately by C.F.W. Walther.

C.F.W. Walther's contributions to the history of Lutheranism in America are many. Following Luther, Wlather insisted first of all that preaching be God's Word, not man's. But this means more than simply quoting Bible passages. Instead, it means reproducing from the pulpit the purpose for which God gave the Scriptures in the first place, to confront men with their sins (Law) and to comfort them with forgiveness (Gospel). Preaching that does not have this twofold aim misses the mark.

Confessional Subscription. What is a Lutheran? What is the nature of subscription to the Lutheran Confessions? Today most of the Lutheran pastors and teachers throughout the world subscribe, at least pro forma, all the confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran church. What does such subscription mean? Is such subscription any longer possible in our day of academic freedom and vaunted autonomy, ecumenism and dialogue?

Sanctification: By Grace Alone. Luther placed justification, the doctrine of God's free grace in Jesus Christ, at the heart of his theology. Man is saved not by anything he does or could hope to do, but by what God has done once and for all in Jesus Christ. Since the Reformation, God's accepting the death of Christ in place of the sinner's death has been the hallmark of Protestantism and more specifically of Lutheran churches.

The Mystical Union. There is a mystical union of God and the believer, which is taught in the Scriptures and experienced by the Christian, but which is difficult to describe. Chronologically its beginning coincides with regeneration and justification; logically it follows upon them, and forms the next stage in the order of salvation. It is not to be interpreted simply as an activity of God in us, but possesses the nature of a personal fellowship (1 John 1:3). . .

Luther and Conversion. The first misconception that Luther warns us about is the notion, so common in much of what passes for preaching today with its altar calls and pleas for people to make a decision for Christ, that conversion is something that we must do; it is our work. Commenting on John 3:3, Luther reminds us that, man's own merit or holiness can contribute nothing toward getting out of the old birth of flesh and blood or achieving the new birth. Man is not born again of his own choice and idea. . .

What is Worship? View #1 sees Christian education as the main thing of the worship service. Christians in this group leave church saying things like, "That was an interesting sermon the Pastor gave today." For them, church is a sort of holy school. View #2 sees the main thing as the worship we bring to God. Christians in this group come to church primarily to sing and say "thank you" to God for all His blessings. For them the main thing in the worship service is what we do for God. . .

Postmodern Times. We are living in a time in which to be modern is to be out of date. As the twentieth century limps to a close, exhausted and disillusioned, and as we begin to enter the third millennium, a new worldview is emerging. We can see it in academia and in public opinion polls, in our pop culture and in our churches. As the twentieth century becomes obsolete, we are entering the postmodern age. . .

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